Oral Allergy Syndrome Treatment: Allergy Medicine

© Yeo2205 | Dreamstime Stock Photos & Stock Free Images

© Yeo2205 | Dreamstime Stock Photos & Stock Free Images

There is currently no specific medicine used for oral allergy syndrome treatment but some people have experienced relief from symptoms by treating the hay fever and pollen allergy through antihistamines. People who are at risk for developing severe symptoms or an anaphylactic reaction may also be encouraged to carry an EpiPen.

For your health safety make sure to always consult with your allergist or doctor before planning or changing your oral allergy syndrome treatment.

Antihistamines

Antihistamines are used to treat the hay fever symptoms of itching, sneezing, and a runny nose. Some people have also experienced fewer oral allergy syndrome symptoms when eating trigger foods by starting an antihistamine several weeks before their trigger pollens blooming season. Still, the best oral allergy syndrome treatment is food avoidance and antihistamines should not be taken just to be able to eat your trigger food. Many antihistamines are available over the counter:

  1. Brompheniramine. This is the active ingredient in Ala-hist, Dimetapp, Bromfed, Poly-Tussin, Q-Tapp, and many other multi-symptom medications. This medication is available over-the-counter, but tends to not come in a long-acting form. Taking this medication can cause sleepiness and should not be taken before driving or operating machinery.
  2. Chlorpheniramine. This is the active ingredient in Chlor-Trimeton, Advil Allergy, Tussionex, and many other multi-symptom medications. This medication is available over-the-counter, but tends to not come in a long-acting form. Taking this medication can cause sleepiness and should not be taken before driving or operating machinery.
  3. Diphenhydramine. This is the active ingredient in Benadryl as well as in many multi-symptom medications. This medication is available over-the-counter, but tends to not come in a long-acting form usually needing to be taken every 4 to 6 hours. Taking this medication can cause sleepiness and should not be taken before driving or operating machinery.
  4. Clemastine. This is the active ingredient in Dayhist and Tavist. This medication is available over-the-counter, but tends to not come in a long-acting form. Taking this medication can cause sleepiness and should not be taken before driving or operating machinery.
  5. Loratadine. This is the active ingredient in Claritin, Dimetapp, Tavist Non-Sedating, and Alavert. This medicine does not cause drowsiness, is long-acting, is available over-the-counter, and can be less expensive.
  6. Desloratadine. This is the active ingredient in Clarinex. This medicine does not cause drowsiness, is long-acting, is available over-the-counter, and can be less expensive.
  7. Cetirizine. This is the active ingredient in Zyrtec and Aller-Tec. This medicine does not cause drowsiness, is long-acting, is available over-the-counter, and can be less expensive.
  8. Levocetirizine. This is the active ingredient in Xyzal. This medicine does not cause drowsiness, is long-acting, is available over-the-counter, and can be less expensive.
  9. Fexofenadine. This is the active ingredient in Allegra. This medicine does not cause drowsiness, is long-acting, is available over-the-counter, and can be less expensive.

Some of these medications may not be safe for children. Before taking any new medications it is always recommended to consult with your doctor to make sure they are safe and beneficial for you to take.

EpiPen

A severe reaction or anaphylactic reaction is rare in oral allergy syndrome but is estimated to happen in as many as 10% of oral allergy syndrome sufferers. During a severe reaction an antihistamine (such as those listed above) will not be enough to prevent the reaction or stop throat swelling. For that reason many doctors will prescribe an ephinephrine auto-injector or EpiPen for people who are at risk for having a severe or anaphylactic reaction. An EpiPen is a preloaded syringe filled with epinephrine for emergency injection in the thigh if experiencing an anaphylactic reaction such as difficulty breathing or throat swelling. You might need an EpiPen if:

  1. You have had a severe allergic reaction in the past.
  2. Have had a reaction to a trigger food even after it had been cooked.
  3. You have had a positive skin allergy test to the trigger food.
  4. Have had a reaction to peanuts, tree nuts, or mustard. These foods are highly likely to become a severe allergy.
  5. Live in an area that has a high rate of severe reactions with certain foods. For example, there is a high rate of severe reactions in people with apple allergies in Spain.
  6. Have had difficulty speaking, swallowing, or experienced throat discomfort with past trigger food reactions.

For more information about anaphylactic reactions please click here.

 

References

Disclaimer: The information contained in this site is for educational purposes only, and should not be used as a substitute for a licensed physician. Please see your physician for diagnosis and treatment of any concerning symptoms or medical condition. Click here to read the full disclaimer.
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